Tag Archives: Stock Dove

Song of Spring

Lo! where the rosy-bosom’d Hours, 
Fair Venus’ train appear, 
Disclose the long-expecting flowers, 
And wake the purple year! 
The Attic warbler pours her throat, 
Responsive to the cuckoo’s note, 
The untaught harmony of spring: 
While whisp’ring pleasure as they fly, 
Cool zephyrs thro’ the clear blue sky 
Their gather’d fragrance fling.
– Thomas Gray, Ode to Spring

I genuinely enjoy all the seasons, but I won’t be original if I admit that Spring is my favourite. Yesterday, the Patch was screaming with the sights, sounds, and smells of early Spring.

It feels like we must must be close to peak Chiffchaff territory saturation; they are singing everywhere.

Common Chiffchaff (Phylloscopus collybita)

I also caught up up with my first Blackcap on the Patch for the year, finding a singing male just South of Heronry Pond on Wanstead Flats.

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Eurasian Blackcap (Sylvia atricapilla)

We are obviously still waiting for most of our Summer migrants to arrive, and all the patch birders have been hoping for an early, interesting, passage migrant. It looks like we will have to wait a little longer. I got my hopes up momentarily when a finch briefly perched in a small tree in the Brooms early on Saturday morning. Unfortunately, it wasn’t a Twite, but a female Linnet – despite my naive hopes based, partly, on the fact that Linnet are rarely seen on the Patch far from around the Jubilee pond.

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Common Linnet (Linaria cannabina)

Spring is showing her wares in other, non-avian, forms too. The yellows have it with the March flowers at the moment on the patch.

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Common Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)

The dandelion above may be common in name and status (amongst that huge and complicated plant family) but they are so magnificent when you stop to look at them; like staring into the sun with its layers and flares and knowing that it will also produce a moon of seeds later in the year. But even more impossibly yellow – albeit also very common on the Patch – is the celandine.

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Lesser Celandine (Ficaria verna)

These early pollen providers, seem to be competing only with the nettles and Blackthorn on the Patch at the moment in terms of nectar for our early butterflies.

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Blackthorn (Prunus spinosa)

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Blackthorn flower in detail

Without these early pollen traps there would be no early butterflies. We have now had most of the butterflies we could expect for this time of year, although I am still missing Comma, but yesterday saw Brimstone, Peacock, and Small Tortoiseshell around the Patch.

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Small Tortoiseshell (Aglais urticae)

Like so many species, the common nature of the Small Tortoiseshell can obscure the fact that it should be far more populous and has undergone shocking falls in numbers in the past few decades.The Spring air made me search for evidence of reproduction in every corner of the Patch, whether it was the mating Robins, or the:

Paired up Stock Dove in the Dell:

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Just one of the pair of Dell Stock Dove (Columba oenas)

A circling pair of Sparrowhawk.

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Female Sparrowhawk (Accipiter nissus)

I was also pleased to tick off a calling Nuthatch, finally found – in a very vocal mood – in the Reservoir Wood.

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Eurasian Nuthatch (Sitta europaea)

So, nothing to report that will elicit much of a twitch on the patch, but nonetheless it is just great to be out on a beautiful Spring day.

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A Big Birding Year: Part XII (summer migrants)

Having been out of the birding loop for a few weeks (including being out of the country for a couple), I returned to find that the steady march of Spring and Summer continues at pace.

My quest to see as many species of bird in a year benefitted from the fact that many Summer arrivals are now in our skies, trees, hedgerows, and reeds.

At the London Wetland Centre on Saturday, I added eight new birds to my year list, five of which were summer migrants…

Such as the noisy but secretive Reed Warbler:

Eurasian Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus scirpaceus)

Eurasian Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus scirpaceus)

… and the notoriously nondescript Garden Warbler (also notoriously badly named, as it is rarely found in gardens):

Garden Warbler (Sylvia borin)

Garden Warbler (Sylvia borin)

More difficult to photograph than even these shy warblers, were some of the speed demons of our summer skies, such as:

Common Tern (Sterna hirundo)

Common Tern (Sterna hirundo)

Sand Martin (Riparia riparia)

Sand Martin (Riparia riparia)

… and one of the few birds able to predate on such small and swift acrobats…

Eurasian Hobby (Falco subbuteo)

Eurasian Hobby (Falco subbuteo)

… although, while I watched it whip about effortlessly in the sky, it was simply feeding on insects and avoiding persistent mobbing from gulls (the photo below illustrating quite clearly how small the hobby is):

Hobby and gull

Also out patrolling the skies was a permanent UK resident:

Eurasian Sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus)

Eurasian Sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus)

Far out in the wetland, I noticed something scuttle past a roosting goose. You may need to look hard just to find it. Whilst the photo is poor, it clearly shows just how tiny Little Ringed Plovers are in comparison to the Canada Goose (and in response to your inevitably raised eyebrow, I don’t know why such a bulky bird finds it comfortable to sleep on one leg either!):

Little Ringed Plover (Charadrius dubius) to the right of the roosting Canada Goose (Branta canadensis)

Little Ringed Plover (Charadrius dubius) to the right of the roosting Canada Goose (Branta canadensis)

…and finally, another blurry shot of the last of the common UK pigeons to be added to my year list:

Stock Dove (Columba oenas)

Stock Dove (Columba oenas)

This set of birds took my tally of species up to 82 for the year so far. Here are a few more Spring snaps I took in Barnes:

Mallard ducklings (Anas platyrhinchos)

Mallard ducklings (Anas platyrhinchos)

Eurasian Coot with chick (Fulica atra)

Eurasian Coot with chick (Fulica atra)

And finally, letting everyone know that some birds are here all year round and that not everything changes…

European Robin (Erithacus rubecula)

European Robin (Erithacus rubecula)