Tag Archives: Mallard

Getting to know the locals

One of the benefits of working the same patch regularly is that, occasionally, you get to know and recognise individual birds. Sometimes this is made easy for us:

Specific locally scarce or rare birds

The recent Red-backed Shrike on Wanstead Flats was the first of its kind locally for 38 years. I am sure there are other juvenile Red-backed Shrike that look very similar to the one we had stay for around 11 days, but nobody in their right mind would think that it was a different bird from one day to the next.

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Red-backed Shrike (Lanius collurio) – yes, I know I have displayed this photo before

Sometimes relatively common passage migrants might stay a day or two. So it was the other day when two quite distinct young Wheatear were found for two days running in the Broomfields.

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Northern Wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe)

Colour-ringed birds

I have mentioned Black-headed Gull ‘2LBA’ before. Recently, I have seen it pretty much every time I have visited Jubilee Pond. I wouldn’t be able to tell you much about the distinct features of the particular bird, but… I don’t need to as it wears its identity pretty clearly on its leg.

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Black-headed Gull (Larus ridibundus) – ‘2LBA’ 

Distinctive individuals

Whilst not wishing to indulge in any species-ist ‘they all look the same’ kind of rhetoric, it is inevitably hard for most of us – even regular and dedicated birders – to get to understand the individual features of birds within one species. However, I am reminded of the late, great, Sir Peter Scott and his painted studies of individual Whooper Swan face markings. But for us mere mortals there seems to be a spectrum from uniquely marked birds through to subtle differences that only close-up and regular study could allow.

At the easy end of that spectrum, you have birds like this rather beautiful, but also ‘manky’, domestic-interbreed Mallard that I have seen on Jubilee and Alexandra ponds.

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Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)

Somewhat further down the spectrum are birds like this pale 3cy argenteus Herring Gull, where the distinctive eyes, mantle colour, moult, and bill markings have let me identify the same bird on several occasions in the last week as I have had the opportunity to get out most days.

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10 September: Herring Gull (Larus argentatus argenteus)

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10 September: Same bird in flight showing missing secondaries

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12 September: same bird, same place (facing different direction)

A Big Birding Year: Part XXVII (End of year flurry)

A year ago I visited Attenborough Nature Reserve in Nottingham. This morning, whilst staying with the in-laws, I returned to watch the dawn in the snow:

Nottingham dawn

For the British, snow is a novelty (last winter it did not snow once in London) and occasionally an inconvenience. For some of our wildlife, persistent freezing weather can be disastrous – it is estimated that some very cold years will see 30-40% of the individual birds in some species wiped out.

Some of the birds at the Attenborough reserve did not look fussed, like these Mute Swans on the River Trent:

Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)

Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)

However, not all the birds appeared quite so relaxed. This Moorhen approached the cracked ice with some trepidation:

Moorhen (Gallinula chloropus)

Common Moorhen (Gallinula chloropus)

… and I detected a greater sense of urgency in the feeding behaviours of some birds such as this female Reed Bunting:

Common Reed Bunting (Emberiza schoeniclus)

Common Reed Bunting (Emberiza schoeniclus)

Moving equally quickly through bushes in search for food was my 101st species of bird photographed in 2014, a bird that would be common to many in the UK, but one I have not seen at all for almost two years and so I was delighted to be reacquainted with:

Eurasian bullfinch (Pyrrhula pyrrhula)

Eurasian bullfinch (Pyrrhula pyrrhula)

A frozen Nottingham had further Christmas gifts for my Big Birding Year of photography, my second Goldeneye captured in pixels this year (albeit very far away – excuse extreme blur):

Male Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula)

Male Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula)

Female Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula)

Female Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula)

Distant ducks would also add to my year list (102):

Goosander [or Common Merganser] (Mergus merganser)

Goosander [or Common Merganser] (Mergus merganser)

And then finally, what is likely to be my last new bird of the year, an absolute gem. Although she remained very far my camera, my 103 species of the year was wonderful and quite rare for the UK. This female Smew will be one of only 100-200 individuals that will have visited the UK this year – I was privileged to end of my year in style:

Smew (Mergellus albellus)

Smew (Mergellus albellus)

Just to remind readers that some ducks do come slightly closer in range, I also took a shots of a Mallard drake:

Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)

Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)

I walked around the frozen landscape reflecting on what has been a wonderful and fun search for British birds and yielded 103 photographs of unique and different species.

I also reminded myself of “the ones that got away”. Birds I saw but which I didn’t get photos of:
Jack Snipe
Bittern
Kingfisher

Happy New Year to you all!

Trent

A Big Birding Year: Part XII (summer migrants)

Having been out of the birding loop for a few weeks (including being out of the country for a couple), I returned to find that the steady march of Spring and Summer continues at pace.

My quest to see as many species of bird in a year benefitted from the fact that many Summer arrivals are now in our skies, trees, hedgerows, and reeds.

At the London Wetland Centre on Saturday, I added eight new birds to my year list, five of which were summer migrants…

Such as the noisy but secretive Reed Warbler:

Eurasian Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus scirpaceus)

Eurasian Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus scirpaceus)

… and the notoriously nondescript Garden Warbler (also notoriously badly named, as it is rarely found in gardens):

Garden Warbler (Sylvia borin)

Garden Warbler (Sylvia borin)

More difficult to photograph than even these shy warblers, were some of the speed demons of our summer skies, such as:

Common Tern (Sterna hirundo)

Common Tern (Sterna hirundo)

Sand Martin (Riparia riparia)

Sand Martin (Riparia riparia)

… and one of the few birds able to predate on such small and swift acrobats…

Eurasian Hobby (Falco subbuteo)

Eurasian Hobby (Falco subbuteo)

… although, while I watched it whip about effortlessly in the sky, it was simply feeding on insects and avoiding persistent mobbing from gulls (the photo below illustrating quite clearly how small the hobby is):

Hobby and gull

Also out patrolling the skies was a permanent UK resident:

Eurasian Sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus)

Eurasian Sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus)

Far out in the wetland, I noticed something scuttle past a roosting goose. You may need to look hard just to find it. Whilst the photo is poor, it clearly shows just how tiny Little Ringed Plovers are in comparison to the Canada Goose (and in response to your inevitably raised eyebrow, I don’t know why such a bulky bird finds it comfortable to sleep on one leg either!):

Little Ringed Plover (Charadrius dubius) to the right of the roosting Canada Goose (Branta canadensis)

Little Ringed Plover (Charadrius dubius) to the right of the roosting Canada Goose (Branta canadensis)

…and finally, another blurry shot of the last of the common UK pigeons to be added to my year list:

Stock Dove (Columba oenas)

Stock Dove (Columba oenas)

This set of birds took my tally of species up to 82 for the year so far. Here are a few more Spring snaps I took in Barnes:

Mallard ducklings (Anas platyrhinchos)

Mallard ducklings (Anas platyrhinchos)

Eurasian Coot with chick (Fulica atra)

Eurasian Coot with chick (Fulica atra)

And finally, letting everyone know that some birds are here all year round and that not everything changes…

European Robin (Erithacus rubecula)

European Robin (Erithacus rubecula)