Tag Archives: Donald Trump

Still waiting

So am I still waiting
For this world to stop hating
Can’t find a good reason
Can’t find hope to believe in

– Sum41, Still waiting

There is a curse. It is the patch birder’s ‘Catch 22’: do you wait for birds to visit your local patch, or do you go out and find them? Do the former and you can be left waiting for indefinite time. Do the latter and you might miss some patch gold.

And so it has been with Waxwing. The irruption of these gorgeous punks this winter has meant we have been waiting expectantly, looking at every berry-bearing tree with the hope of a child on Christmas Eve. Prominent trees have even been laced with apples. But the Waxwing have not come. Or, we have not seen them if they have.

This weekend I cracked. I left my patch and went in search of them elsewhere. We say ‘them’ because we always imagine a flock, but I saw a Rogue One. The lone X-wing… *ahem*, I mean… Waxwing (alright, I’ll quit with the Star Wars puns) has been a regular feature, delighting the crowds at the Rainham Marshes reserve for a few days now.

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Bohemian Waxwing (Bombycilla garrulus)

“You scoped it?”: This was one of my fellow patch birders’ response when he saw this photo. He has a point. The Waxwing was showing exceptionally well and close in. To understand why I didn’t get a better shot with my camera, instead of a digiscoped view with phone and  scope, is its own little story about patience and waiting: or lack of…

I did get a few shots with my camera, but was unlucky with the position of the light and obscuring branches etc etc. But really, the truth is the fact that makes me a terrible twitcher: I simply hate crowding round a bird like a paparazzi scrum around a Kardashian. Whilst everyone waddled from bush to bush as the Waxwing moved from perch to berry-larder, I sometimes stayed behind and trained my camera on something else instead. Like a Fieldfare for example – only too happy to mop up the excess fruit intended for our Bohemian visitor.

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Fieldfare (Turdus Pilaris)

And then I abandoned the scene altogether to walk around the rest of the reserve in rather more peace.

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Great Tit (Parus major)

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Common Snipe (Gallinago gallinago)

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Common Reed Bunting (Emberiza shoeniclus)

As you would expect with Rainham – the estuary walk from Stone Barges and the reserve itself – there were some pleasurable bird sightings and a total of 15 year ticks for the day – January is great like that. Redshank fed and called loudly to each other across the mud, a few Black-tailed Godwit  scoured the waterline shores whilst flocks of tiny Dunlin whirred over their heads and bigger flocks of bigger Lapwing took to the skies and back down again to the ponds with their characteristic jitteriness. Curlew and Snipe alerted me to their presence by dropping in from the sky. Birding from dawn until after dusk I watched gulls move to and from their roosts, with my first Great Black-backed Gulls of the year marching up and down on the decks of static boats like attentive sea captains.

Hundreds of Teal were joined by even larger flocks of Wigeon alongside a smattering of Shelduck and even >16 Pintail.I also felt a shred of envy as I watched flocks of over thirty Skylark (we never get that many on the patch – the dogs and habitat destruction undoubtedly help ensure that).

Patience was rewarded a little on the river walk…

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Thames at Rainham (I have taken nearly exactly the same picture almost every time I visit).

Rock Pipit bobbed up and down the man-made river banks and flood defences, whilst their  meadow cousins seemed to be put up in the air from almost every patch of grass I walked past. But it was the subtly different markings, and colouration, that drew my attention to a pipit feeding in the mud. It was only when it took off that I could see the bright white on the sides of the tail that I felt fully sure in calling it as the third of the ‘common’ pipits: Water Pipit (a bird I didn’t even see once last year). When I later met another birder  who described seeing a ‘Wipit’ in exactly the same place, I felt even more comfortable about my tick. Unfortunately my efforts to identify it in the field meant that my camera was still in my bag when it flew off towards London.

Later that afternoon, I went back to my patch to test my patience again in my two-year long patch search for Little Owl and Woodcock – they are becoming like patch-bogey birds of mine. My dusk-walks through the copses produced no owls and so I walked over to the Roding to stake-out the Woodcock that apparently, like clockwork, sails out of the woodland and over the river to begin its nocturnal feeding on the golf course every evening. I have tried this waiting game before, and once with serial Woodcock-watcher, Nick, but yet again went home empty handed (or without the tick, in case my metaphor leads you to believe I would be vile enough to join the ‘hunters’ who shoot the declining populations of these wonderful birds).

Standing by the river as the sky turned from red to purple to dark blue, I turned it even bluer as I cursed and muttered about late-evening golfers and a UFO (that’s Unwanted Flying Object, rather than ‘Unidentified’) that buzzed around like some loathsome mechanical insect, and I was sure dissuaded Mr or Mrs Woodcock from leaving his/her daytime woodland lair until after we had all disappeared and (s)he could be alone with his/her darkness and worms.

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Drone over the golf course

And so I went home, still waiting, but happy at a full day of birding. I left the world of the wild and re-entered the human world and reflected on the ‘hating’ and intolerance that seem so prevalent at the moment. My fleeting sadness at not seeing a Woodcock was replaced by a deeper and uglier melancholy over some of the actions our ‘so called’ leaders are taking. The day began with a punk, the Waxwing, and so my post ends, as it began, with the punk lyrics of Sum41:

Can’t find a good reason
Can’t find hope to believe in*

* I am not yet at the stage of punk-cynicism where I have lost hope, but then… I am not a Syrian refugee escaping terror and being told I am not welcome anywhere.
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2016: Wanstead wrap-up

How will 2016 be remembered?

The year the UK chose to turn its back on the EU?

The year the US chose Donald Trump to be its President?

The year where it seemed that almost every celebrity with any talent popped their clogs?

The year when I saw over 100 species of birds on the patch in a year?

The year I found a Yellow-browed Warbler on the patch?

Okay. So the last two are probably only milestones for me. Two days ago was my last walk around the patch for 2016. I am now on my other patch in the South of France for a few days (undoubtedly more on that later).

It was a quiet and bright day on the Flats and I walked around, working the key areas, finding a few of our favourites but also reflecting back on the year that has been.

The first bird of interest was a Stonechat by the small pond we call ‘Cat and Dog’. This bird framed the year for me: a Stonechat overwintered (2015/2016) in the same place a year ago. Seeing this bird also reminded me of a happy moment in February when I found the first new Stonechat of the year by a different pond (‘Angel’) on the patch.

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Common Stonechat (Saxicola torquatas)

I saw our resident Meadow Pipits and Skylarks which have become like friends to me (although I am not sentimental enough to believe that the relationship is anything other than one way).

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Eurasian Skylark (Alauda arvensis)

I stood by Alexandra Pond and remembered photographing a Hooded Crow there – a very rare sight for London.

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Hooded Crow (Corvus Cornix)

In fact, I stood by Alex for quite some time as I tried to photograph the Yellow-browed Warbler that has been there now for over 20 days! My efforts were barely rewarded with a very (very!) poor record shot…

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Yellow-browed Warbler (Phylloscopus inornatus)

But it also reminded me of just a few months ago when I found the first confirmed YBW in 150 years of records. Without a doubt my best moment on the patch:

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A rather better record shot from October

But this second YBW also brought my mind snapping back from the past and into the future. Given its sticky nature, there is a high chance that it will stay around long enough for the guys to tick it off on their ceremonial 1 January bird walk for their 2017 patch lists. My chances of doing that are very much slimmer as I don’t return from France until 8 January.

Breaking the ‘100’ Patch species for the year was great, but I don’t plan on focusing quite as much attention on my patch year list in 2017. Don’t get me wrong – I shall race out of my door if I hear of anything new and exciting that is out there, but I intend to focus my energies on other activities on the patch. Perhaps spending a little more time surveying.

For example, trying to get a handle on the numbers of these guys on the patch (spread across relatively few flocks on the fringes):

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House Sparrow (Passer domesticus)

Ticks and misses

This year on the patch I have ticked off 13 new birds, taking my ‘patch list’ total to 111. But, there were also some misses. Birds I saw last year but did not see in 2016. In fact, there were nine of them. Some were special birds that I would not expect to see every year, like Slavonian Grebe, Red-legged Partridge, and maybe even Wood Warbler. Others, however, one would hope to see on the patch every year and were glaring gaps, most notably, Red Kite and Common Tern. But there was a net profit – taking my patch year total to 102 – and so I am happy.

2016 was a great year for me patch-birding, and I hope that 2017 is equally rewarding.